Pointers for better searching: Articles

Articles key

An article index records the existence, location and properties - including the subject - of articles in the journals and books it covers. It is designed to help you to find where articles that you might have an interest in because of their author, title or subject have been published. Some of the articles that you will find in an index will be in the home library collection, and some will not.   To find which are might involve an additional search.

Here is a demonstration

A typical record from ATLA Religion Index, one of the largest article indexes available.

Notes

  • You can use the field structure of the records of the index to make your searches for articles more precise.
  • Most of the articles that the DML holds in its collection of journals and books are indexed in one or more of the article indexes available on our Periodical indexes page. This page is therefore a very good place at which to start any search for theological articles.

Articles key

If the article that you wish to acquire is in a journal then the next step is to consult The Dalton McCaughey Library A to Z of Journals. This is a very thorough listing of the library's holdings of both printed and electronic journals.

Note

The Dalton McCaughey Library A to Z of Journals is a discovery and access service (find that we have them - and open them) for all of the library's e-journals (c. 650 listed); and a location service for most of the library's printed journals (600+ listed).


Articles key

If the article that you wish to acquire is in a book then the next step is to consult DML's Online catalogue

Note

All of the books in DML's collection - both printed and electronic - and most of the journals (but not the articles within them) are listed in the Online catalogue.


Articles key

When an article index gives you a link to an e-copy of an article (usually in PDF), that is because the article has been found in one of the three full text databases of periodical literature that the library subscribes to.

Notes

  • Only the EBSCO article indexes - ATLA Religion Database, Catholic Periodical and Literature Index, NTA and OTA - know the contents of the three full-text databases. The other indexes available on the website do not.
  • The three full text databases do not contain all of the e-journals to which the library subscribes. So if a record found in a search of an EBSCO article index is not presented with a link to an electronic copy of the article in question, that does not mean that the library does not hold that article in electronic form. To discover whether, and in what form, the article is available to you in the library, consult the Dalton McCaughey Library A to Z of Journals. (See a key about this resource elsewhere on this page.)

Articles key

When using a phrase in a key word search, put the phrase in inverted commas.

Note


Doing this filters out results in which the words in your phrase occur separately, or in a different order.

Articles key

Narrow your keyword searches in an article index to particular fields to make them retrieve more relevant results.

Note

A keyword search limited by field name asks the database for occurrences of your word or expression anywhere within that field in all of the records in the index.


Articles key

Use an article index's authority lists (its lists of the headings that it uses) to improve search accuracy.

Example search

Search for articles on Jeremiah 31:15

Note

Using an authority list in a search of an article index, like using an index at the end of a book, is a process of browsing an alphabetically arranged list for a heading that seems relevant to your interest. Sometimes the heading that has been used by the indexer eludes you and it is hard to find your subject in the subject list. When this happens, search for a relevant article with key words. When you have found one, look inside it for the headings that have been applied to it.  These are some of the headings that the database uses for the subject you are interested in. Almost always, such headings are hyperlinked inside the record. Click on them there, and activate a new search based on subject authorities.